The Importance Of Sex In Fiction (Or “This Cartoon Is Hot And That’s Okay”)

Drink it in folks; this may be the only time I can LEGALLY get away with showing bare breasts on this site. Source: Wikipedia

Drink it in folks; this may be the only time I can LEGALLY get away with showing bare breasts on this site.
Source: Wikipedia

So, one reader this week left a comment on my discussion of Steven Universe‘s Garnet and the purpose of her sexualized nature saying that they found the article after doing a light search to see if other people felt the same way about her. They also stated how they felt odd about being so attracted to an animated character and wanted to know if there was “something wrong” with them.

Well, to that reader and to others like them, I say to you this; No, there’s nothing wrong with you.

Sex and sexuality have been a major part of fiction since the creation of fiction. When someone invented the wall, someone else said, “not bad, but it would look better with a bunch o’ NEKKID people on it,” and created the first mural.

Arthurian lore is a great example of this. The tales of King Arthur and the likes of Sir Galahad, Sir Lancelot, Lady Guinevere, Morgan Le Fey and others are often centered around or even solely motivated by sex.

Even when the issue of censorship started coming into play, people found ways around these ‘decency laws’ to simulate and imply sex without actually showing it as a legal loophole. And thus innuendo became mainstream.

Basically, sex is a big deal in fiction because it’s something we either all do or are at least affected by; a universal constant that we can all relate to. Even asexuals are affected by the lack of desire for intercourse. That’s why asexuality is STILL a sexual orientation.

It’s for this reason that I get a little hot-headed whenever I see trolls online poking fun at people who draw erotic art, read hentai manga, or have an interest in anthropomorphism. Here are a group of people engaging in a time-honored global tradition and now they’ve come under attack by closed-minded bullies that can’t separate reality from fantasy.

Fiction is fiction and fantasy is fantasy; no healthy-minded human being will debate that. The use of fiction and fantasy is a means of self-exploration; exploration of our minds, our morals, and – indeed – our inner desires. And to this day, we have yet to find a better way to explore those notions than through fictional narrative.

Basically, if you aren’t willing to indulge in flights of fantasy – including sexual fantasy – while reading a book, watching a movie or playing a video game, why are you even bothering with a story in the first place?

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Rejected Princesses: The Blog For People Who Think Disney Princesses Are Too Soft

“Well-behaved women seldom make history.”
Source: Rejected Princesses

There are two truths of the universe that this blog illustrates consistently and without fail; I love to support worthy talents that I feel don’t get enough attention and I F***ING hate the Disney Princess model of storytelling.

To that end, I thank Jason Porath for doing what he does over at Rejected Princesses.

For the uninitiated, Jason was a former visual effects animator for Dreamworks (THE “anti-Disney” in their own right). But the one-off conversation he had with his friends asking who was the least likely historical/mythological figure to be selected as a Disney Princess style heroine in a children’s movie inspired him to flaunt his illustrating and writing skills as well.

What’s funny is that Jason – a white, straight man from Kentucky with no background in history or drawing (his major in college was Film Theory) – seems to realize that he’s the least likely person to be spearheading a multicultural, historical, feminist art blog that has gone viral. However, I would argue how that just proves that anyone can have a worthy voice and extraordinary talent.

So, what about the blog itself? Basically, Jason has taken notes on THOUSANDS of famous women from history, legend, and myth that he feels would be deemed by studios as, “too awesome, awful, or offbeat for kids’ movies.” He then proceeds to gather information from various credible sources, illustrate them in a Disney-esque style that he feels reflects both their real-life appearance and personality/story, and shares their tale with the world – recently in the form of full comics.

I think my favorite tale was his take on the bitter-sweet life of Lyudmila Pavlichenko; the ‘Lady Death’ of Russia during World War II and holder of the title of the world’s deadliest female sniper (309 confirmed kills by the age of 25). Jason’s rendition of her story shows a woman’s dark descent into bitter hatred only to be saved by one kind soul – in this case, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.

One of the nice features of Jason’s site is how he included collapsible footnotes between panels of the comics. This allows the reader to get the full story without cluttering the page with asterisks or simply enjoy the epic tale of a princess escaping her imprisonment only to come back with an army without fretting over the history.

Of course, he also has a humorous side to him and does less history driven comics with a more comedic bent to them.

Naturally, this is the point where I urge you to support his work and there’s no shortage of ways to do this. He sells prints of his work on Redbubble and his official Rejected Princesses book is available for autographed pre-order. So the next thing you should probably do is buy them lest you face a beheading from Lady Ching for your cheapskate antics.