Embracing Darkness and Why The Agent Hates to Self-Silence

“No, me; I will NOT shut up. This is some important s***.”
Source: Thinking Healthy

Just a quick stream-of-consciousness style rant today to discuss how I apparently have a ‘bad habit’ among my more private circle of friends.

I keep a private Facebook page exclusively for friends and family where I allow myself to get much darker in my speech and tackle weightier topics that I don’t discuss here simply because I treat this corner of my part of the internet like a business and I don’t want to drive people off.

But, if I’m being honest, that kind of pisses me off. I hate having to do that.

However, I got reminded of why I do that recently. You see, I share those dark stories and thoughts because it’s my way of letting others who may be struggling with depressing crap that I’m somebody that can relate, is listening, cares about what you have to say, and wants to see the world change for the better. I legitimately want people to turn to me for emotional support.

The problem is that when people see a long string of sad posts saying how I relate to people with depression, praising artists for speaking out against bullying, or sharing stories commending parents for being aware of the danger their kid may be involved in, they think that I’m about to go off my nut.

And while I may get annoyed with the ever-echoing mantra of, “are you okay,” don’t begrudge those people for wanting to check up on me. After all, they’re just as worried about me as I am about them. And I’d like to think ALL of us are worried about the state of the world. It’s only natural to want to be concerned with the each other.

But the fact of the matter is this; I talk about dark, depressing things because I feel that denying them is to deny serious look into the human condition. I want people to see just what’s happening in the world and understand how people are feeling until they have no choice but to do something about it as a collective whole.

Of course, I realize that part of the fault is my own. Nobody likes being told how much of a crap-sack the world is when there’s obviously plenty of good in it that keeps getting ignored (why do you think I post #GoodNewsFriday on Twitter every week?), but it seems just as easy these days to just ignore the horrible stuff and act like it never happens.

Basically, what I’m trying to say is that we all have a duty to speak up and act when we see injustice and inequality in the world and remind those that are suffering that we want to help them. Go and enjoy the good things in life that keep you going; that’s your right and what we all need every day. But don’t forget to step into the shadows every once and a while so you can remind yourself and others when and where there’s a candle that needs lighting.

The Power of (Justified) Anger

Normally, I’d add a witty remark, but this serves the purpose of setting the theme all on its own.
Source: happytoinspire.blogspot.com

While looking for weird things online to comment on, I found this article on The Huffington Post where a man conducts an amazing experiment in social behavior. Countless people confronted him and gave him a thorough dressing down for wearing a placard that read “F*** The Poor”, but not one stopped to help his cause when he changed his sign to read “Help The Poor.”

This, to me, illustrates an uncomfortable aspect of our society and in human psychology; we are much more likely to act on anger than on kindness.

We all know that it’s wrong that so many people who work hard to make ends meet and fail or want to work hard and aren’t given the opportunity exist, but it seems that it’s only when people are somehow directly offended by it that they are motivated to do something about it.

Now, this is a problem because it means that true altruism becomes a rarity within a society. In addition, anger is a force that is very difficult to turn off once it has been started and can become toxic when left unchecked.

However, it doesn’t take much effort to see that many changes for the better came as a result of the wrath and frustration of others. Women’s rights have made leaps and bounds because one group of 68 women (and the 32 men that supported them) were sick of not having the comforts and rights of men. Racial and ethnic minorities became more recognized when they called out their oppressors.

Obviously, I’m not saying that everyone should riot in the streets over the injustices that we face today. I am saying, however, that it seems that being angry enough at a problem to want change it is a necessary phase; messy and undesirable as it maybe.

To put it in the geekiest terms I can muster, the movie Network was right; before any change for the better can happen, you have to be mad enough to say, “I’m a human being, Goddamn it! My Life has Value!